About your Search

20130126
20130203
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
solution, and this is where the united states has talked about smart power that's not just defense and diplomacy but also includes economic development. and that's really the key in trying to deal with the intense poverty and sense of need and desperation in this large and strategically located african nation. i was in bamaco in the 1990s during the first visit of the secretary of state and the great question was mali as a model for africa, could you have democracy endure in a country which doesn't have much of a middle class, where poverty is so rampant and doesn't have a whole lot of outside aid to help it develop. and so the great question is not just how many resources are devoted right now to get rid of the jihadists, extremists, marginalize, recapture the north, allow for democratic elections to put back a representative government, but what do you do, what does the outside world do to create a viable state and stabilize -- create a model all over again in this region now of deep instability? >> the outside world can't ever do that in my view. i don't think it's ever succeed
force. francis beinecke, president of national resources defense council and ta-nehisi coates. good morning. >> good morning. >> i was surprised about that speech. were you? >> surprised and excited. we were hoping to get the president's commitment. he made it very strongly. this was not a one line or two words climate change. eight sentences, policy, commitment. >> you're counting the sentences there, that's -- >> we're no longer counting the words. that's progress. counting the words for four years, now we're onto -- i think it was a very bold commitment on his part. if you were there, i know phaedra was there, paul was, you probably were. the cheer rippled down the mall. >> if only those were the people that determined the future of our climate policy. >> that's true, but they are the base. i think you have to move from the base out. >> i want to get to a series of substantive issues about what exactly -- when we get to brass tacks about what the president can do. we know the republican house isn't just -- isn't going to vote for anything. before we get to that, one thing you hea
can say who can come in and who can come out. you have borders that are defensible. within those borders, you have a democratic policy or whatever kind of regime you have. the state has a monopoly. this is all constituent pillars of what it means to be a country. when you say there are these negative costs to defending that border, making that border impenetrable or defensible, i think there are some people out there who say, well, look, there's costs to everything, but this has to be a priority because in some existential sense, we cannot be a nation unless we have this kind of thing. >> but there are differences with class, and what i think eliseo is talking about is why is it that enforcement comes out so heavily and so strong against people who are maybe from rural parts of mexico or central america? why is it you can allow for other countries to have access here as soon as they touch the shores? why is it that you can pay your way into this country also if you come from indonesia or china or other areas and have citizenship granted to you in a matter of time? so there's a lo
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)